mobile-menu mobile-menu-arrow Menu
welcoming

You don't have any favourites selected yet.


To add a property to your favourites, click 'Favourite' and we'll save it for you.


 
Email this list | Close
Your name: Send to the following address(es) Send Tip: Send to multiple recipients by separating email addresses with a comma.

Show favourites
 
fav-image
Home » Activities » Walking
 

Walking

  • Mull of Galloway Trail


    Mull of Galloway Trail

    The Mull of Galloway Trail is 24 miles long. This spectacular trail runs from Stranraer to the Mull of Galloway, Scotland`s most southerly point. (more…)

     
     
  • South West Coastal 300 #SWC300


    on the SW300 Mull of Galloway

    The South West Coastal 300 route in South West Scotland is a stunning drive of just over 300 Miles. There is so much to explore, including a multitude of interesting towns and villages. You could easily spend a week or two on the South West Coastal 300 and only scratch the surface!

    Much of your route follows our many miles of awesome coastline while you will also have the opportunity to marvel at our hills, glens, forests and lochs and soak up some of the abundant history of our area. The roads are quiet too!

    As the South West Coastal 300 is roughly circular, you can start wherever you please. Spend as long as you like exploring the huge diversity of scenery and natural beauty on display along our quiet roads.

    Drive through the magnificent Mennock Pass in the Lowther Hills to reach the coast of the Solway Firth. On the way, you may will visit Scotland’s Highest Village – Wanlockhead.

    Swc300

    Discover delightful towns and villages along the Solway Coast such as Kippford and Kirkcudbright as you head for the remote Mull of Galloway – Scotland`s most southerly point and delight in views of the Galloway Hills, Lakeland Fells, the Isle of Man and even the Mountains of Mourne!

    Explore the Machars Peninsula along the way where you can discover the history of St Ninian and find out about the rich history we have to offer.

    Driving north from the Mull of Galloway, pop into Portpatrick with its harbourside pubs and restaurants as you head towards Stranraer. Look out for seals at Lendalfoot as you head up the Ayrshire coast to Culzean and Alloway before turning inland towards Sanquhar……….. .and did we mention the quiet roads!

    Done the NC500? Try the SWC300 – we look forward to welcoming you, we’re a friendly bunch!!

    Basically, you can start exploring our SWC300 route at any point along the way. However, the main access points are likely to be Stranraer where there is a railway service from Glasgow. Stranraer is also close to the terminal for the Belfast Ferry. Alloway,  is near Ayr with road and rail links from Glasgow. Sanquhar which has a rail service to Carlisle, Newcastle and Glasgow. Dumfries which is close to the A74 and M6

    We will start in Stranraer, for no particular reason other than that you’ve got to start the South West Coastal 300 somewhere!

    Head north on the A77 along the coast of Loch Ryan to Cairnryan where you are likely to see one or more of the ferries which sail from terminals at each end of the village to Northern Ireland.

    The road soon climbs through Glenapp and as you descend towards Ballantrae, you will catch glimpses of Ailsa Craig, a volcanic (extinct) island famed for granite used for curling stones. It’s worth turning left once you enter Ballantrae to pause on the sea front, take in the views of Ailsa Craig and Arran and have a look at the small harbour. Maybe even have a game of putting!

    Rejoin the A77 at the other end of Ballantrae and soon the road climbs over Benane Hill then descends to Lendalfoot. Just before Lendalfoot you can pull in to a parking area and view a memorial to the Russian Cruiser Varyag which ran aground off Lendalfoot in 1920. Seals can often be spotted lazing on the nearby rocks.

    Ailsa Craigg for Lendalfoot on SWC300

    Ailsa Craig from Lendalfoot

    From Lendalfoot, the road hugs the coastline and takes you through Girvan where you may wish to spend some time checking out its shops and cafes. Girvan has an interesting harbour where a RNLI Lifeboat is based and where fishing boats can often be seen.

    Stay on the A77 and follow the coast as far as Turnberry, passing several cafes. Here we leave the A77 and take the A719. Pass the manicured lawns of Trump Turnberry Golf Resort to Maidens, another pretty coastal village. The road continues past the entrance to Culzean Castle and down the “Electric Brae” where your car appears to be rolling uphill! Onwards the road approaches Dunure with jawdropping views of Arran. Holy Isle and Culzean Castle. It`s well worth a detour of a mile or so to enter Dunure Village to explore its pretty harbour and the extensive ruins of its 13th Century Castle and Dove Cote.

    Return to the A719 from where its a short distance to Alloway, a suburb of Ayr and famed for being the birthplace of Robert Burns and the setting for his epic poem, Tam o’ Shanter. You may want to stop and check out Burns Cottage and Burns Birthplace Museum or perhaps spend some time exploring Ayr itself.

    Dunure on the SWC300

    Dunure Harbour beside the SWC300

    South West Coastal 300

    Cottages line the streets of Kirkmichael

    Once you’re ready to continue the SWC300, rejoin the A77 via Doonholm Road and head south (right) to pass through Minishant, (if you have satnav, you may with to key in Kirkmichael to keep you right). A short distance from Minishant, turn left and follow the B7045 to Kirkmichael and onwards to Straiton. You are now in Galloway Forest Park – the largest Forest Park in the whole of Britain!

    Kirkmichael is a conservation village with streets lined with cottages, many of which are more than 200 years old. Further on, Straiton is also a conservation village which dates back to the 18th Century. Views on the approach to Straiton are dominated by the hilltop obelisk memorial to Lt Col James Hunter Blair. Both Kirkmichael and Straiton have community run village stores. Straiton makes an ideal base for a walking holiday with 5 short walking trails (1.25 to 4.25 miles) all starting and finishing in the village.

    SWC300 between Straiton and Dalmellington

    Continue your South West Coastal 300 adventure by turning left on to the B741 for Dalmellington, a former weaving centre and mining village.  Dalmellington is now better known for the nearby Scottish Dark Sky Observatory as the Galloway Forest Dark Sky Park was the first Dark Sky Park in the UK.  A short section of the road – about 2 miles is single track but there are plenty passing places and good visibility as the road goes through delightful open hilly countryside.  Although, not on the SWC300, beautiful Loch Doon is close to Dalmellington and offers the opportunity to spot an osprey and to visit the ruins of Loch Doon Castle which was built by Robert the Bruce or his father around 1200 ADThe South West Coastal 300 continues on the B741 through open and forested countryside to New Cumnock where you turn right onto the A76 to Sanquhar, first passing through Kirkconnel. Both town.s are on the banks of the River Nith which is renowned for its excellent trout and salmon fishing. Sanquar is home to the Oldest Post Office in the World – it dates back to 1712 and pre-dates adhesive postage stamps  by over a century! The Southern Upland Way passes through providing walking opportunities.  Crawick Multiverse, a renowned Land Art project is nearby.

    Swc300

    On the Mennock Pass heading for Scotland’s Highest Village

    Just out of Sanquhar, turn left onto the B797 signposted for Wanlockhead. Drive through the magnificent Mennock Pass, following a stream with hills on both sides of the road. Soon you are at Wanlockhead which is Scotland’s Highest Village!

    SWC 300 Wanlockhead

    Driving past Wanlockhead on the South West Coastal 300

    Wanlockhead and nearby Leadhills are famed for their mining heritage – including gold,  and the villages have a fascinating history. Find out more at the Museum of Lead Mining.In Leadhills, take a right hand turn onto the B7040 towards Elvanfoot where the road follows a recently born River Clyde. Slightly north of Elvanfoot, your route passes below the A74 and join the B7076, a quiet road which follows the main road and pop into Moffat, just off the route. Moffat, a bustling town with plenty shops has a newly refurbished museum. Moffat is also on the Southern Upland Way and has many walks for you to enjoy.

    Continue on the B7076 and visit Lockerbie where you join the A709 to Dumfries passing through Lochmaben as you go. You will probably want to stop and spend some time in Dumfries with its many attractions including Robert Burns’ House and Centre and Moat Brae House and others too numerous to list.

    Swc300 Sandyhills

    From the SWC300 near Sandyhills

    From Dumfries, follow the A710 for New Abbey. New Abbey is famed for Sweetheart Abbey which is right in the centre of the village. The history of Sweetheart Abbey dates back to 1273 when the abbey was built by the widow of John Balliol, a prominent figure on Scottish history. The village also has an 18th century corn mill which has been fully restored and is another popular attraction.Continue on the A710 and soon you reach the Solway Coast with views of the Lake District. When you reach Kirkbean, you might want to divert a few miles to  Southerness., one of the oldest lighthouses in Scotland, to the delightful coastal village of Carsethorn or to Arbigland to visit the birthplace of John Paul Jones, often referred to as the “Father of the U.S. Navy).

    Back to our route and continue along the A710 where the road soon hugs the coast and passes through Sandyhills with its beautiful beach. When you reach Colvend, we recommend that you divert to Rockcliffe, another delightful coastal village from which there is a beautiful and very popular coastal walk to Kippford ( tea room in the former and pubs in the latter). This is called the Jubilee Walk and is about 2.5 miles return.

    After this further detour, return to the A710 until just before Dalbeattie where you turn left on to the A711 down the other side of the Urr Estuary through Auchencairn with its smuggling heritage to Dundrennan. Like New Abbey, Dundrennan is famed for its Abbey which was built in the 12th Century and was where Mary Queen of Scots sheltered during her last hours in Scotland.

    Our route continues to Scotlands Artist’s Town – Kirkcudbright with its many galleries including the new Kirkcudbright Gallery, a gallery of national significance opened on the summer of 2018. Kirkcudbright also has an interesting harbour and many independent shops and cafes. Cross the bridge over the River Dee and drive on the B727 alongside the shore past the beautiful Dhoon beach with its views of Little Ross Island and its lighthouse.

    Continue along the B727 via Borgue to join the A75 near Gatehouse of Fleet. You may wish to divert into Gatehouse of Fleet before continuing along the A75 passing Creetown to reach the roundabout outside Newton Stewart where you will find plenty of shops and cafes for supplies and refreshments. The drive from Gatehouse of Fleet to Newton Stewart provides great views of the Galloway Hills and Wigtown Bay.

    South West Coastal 300

    Isle of Whithorn on the Machars Peninsula

    From the Newton Stewart roundabout, our route heads south on the A714 to Scotland’s Book Town – Wigtown which has bookshops galore and several cafes. A few miles south of Wigtown, just past the village of Kirkinner, take the B7004 for Garlieston on the shores of Wigtown Bay. You can detour a very short distance into Garlieston itself – another beautiful coastal village famed for the Mulberry Harbours which helped bring an end to WW2. Rejoin the South West Coastal 300 southwards to the Isle of Whithorn with its pretty harbour.

    From Isle of Whithorn, we strongly advise you visit nearby Whithorn to find out about the history of St Ninian and to visit the recently opened Iron Age Roundhouse. Return to the SWC300 where you head close to the shoreline via Monreith and Port William to rejoin the A75 near Glenluce. After a short distance, turn left and follow the B7084 to Sandhead

    Join the A716 and head south for the Mull of Galloway. Although the road passes behind Sandhead, its easy to turn left into the village and rejoin the main road at the far end. Sandhead has an easily accessed beach several miles long and windsurfers and sand yachts can often be seen.

    Continue on the A716 which hugs the coastline through Ardwell to Drummore where you will find Scotland`s most southerly shop and a community run information centre.

    Leaving Drummore, follow the signs for the Mull of Galloway along the B7041. The road offers spectacular views which change rapidly as you head south. Although the last few miles of the road are single track there are plenty of passing places.

    The Mull of Galloway is,for many, one of the highlights of our route and somewhere you can spend several hours soaking up the atmosphere and views, checking out the bird life at the RSPB reserve and visiting the lighthouse. The Café at Mull of Galloway is built right at the most Southerly Point of Scotland!

    on the SW300 Mull of Galloway

    Scotland`s most Southerly Point , the end of the road- The Mull of Galloway

    Retrace your route and, just before Drummore, follow the signs for Port Logan where you turn right and, after a couple of miles, rejoin the A716 northwards. Port Logan has a another beautiful beach and nearby is “Scotland`s most Exotic Garden” – Logan Botanic Garden.
    Continue northwards and when the road reaches Sandhead, turn left onto the B7042 ( signposted Portpatrick) and follow the signs until a few miles before Portpatrick. The B7042 is fairly narrow and some may prefer to remain on the A716 through Stoneykirk before turning left towards Portpatrick. The “scenic” route leaves the B7042 an turns left a few miles before Portpatrick at a sign for Knockinaam. Turn right just before the hotel and the road continues with spectacular views of the Irish Sea, the ruins of Dunskey Castle and Portpatrick itself. Turning right at the end of this road, you rejoin the A77 which takes you back to Stranraer. However you will probably want to spend some time in Portpatrick first where you will find several bars and restaurants on the harbourside.

    From Portpatrick, follow the A77 and turn left at Lochans to return to Stranraer where your adventure started.

     

    Outside Scotland’s Highest Hotel

    Please return to South West Scotland soon to enjoy the other routes we have for you such as the Scottish Castles Route or the Burns Country Run.

    Visit South West Scotland thank Dave Smith and Motor Cycle Scotland, Buccleuch Arms, Moffat for use of the South West Coastal 300 Route idea which has been adapted from their original version.

    Photo Credits:-

    Ailsa Craig copyright Roderick Leitch Photography

    Dalveen Pass – copyright Visit Scotland

     
     
  • Portpatrick Cliff Path Walks


    portpatrick cliff walk

    From Portpatrick there are excellent cliff paths in both directions, north and south. These offer a range of options for stunning walks with awesome scenery. (more…)

     
     
  • Galloway Forest Park – Bruntis Loch @ Kirroughtree


    7 stanes bruntis loch

    Bruntis Loch is a real beauty spot near the Vistor Centre at Kirroughtree in Galloway Forest Park. The loch can be accessed by a short walk on a good surface. This short walk  is one of many Galloway Forest Park walks andcan be done on its own or combined with a number of options for a  longer walk. (more…)

     
     
  • Crawick Multiverse


    Crawick Multiverse is a spectacular artland, visitor attraction and events venue utilising landscape art to transform a former open cast coal mine into an outdoor space that can be enjoyed by future generations.

    Globally-renowned landscape artist Charles Jencks transformed the site which opened in summer 2015. It links the themes of space, astronomy and cosmology, creating a truly inspiring landmark that will appeal to everyone from art enthusiasts and scientists to walkers and the wider community.

    The site is cared for by The Crawick Multiverse Trust, a charity registered in Scotland (SCO39940). By visiting this extraordinary artland, you are helping maintain the Multiverse for current and future generations to enjoy. Thank you for your support.

     
     
  • Annandale Cycles


     

    Welcome to Annandale Cycles of Caledonian Place, Moffat.

    We repair and sell new and second-hand bicycles and offer accommodation for cyclists looking to be centrally-located for the 7 Stanes Mountain Bike Trails at Ae, Innerleithen, Glentress and Mabie and the Southern Upland Way which passes close by.

    Our accommodation, with secure bike lock-up and secure parking, is also a perfect stop-over for anyone cycling between John o’ Groats and Land’s End.

    We repair all makes of bicycle and sell on- and off-road bikeschildren’s bikes and folding bikes.

    We are open from 9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday and from 10am to 2pm, Saturday. 

    Call in and see us today!

    We are a Dumfries & Galloway Council Trusted Trader.

     
     
  • Rigg Bay to Cruggleton Coastal Walk


    cruggleston castle near garlieston

    A seaside walk in the Machars of Galloway
    Rigg Bay near Garlieston to Cruggleton Castle (about 2 hours there and back). (more…)

     
     
  • Easterbrook Hall


    Full of grandeur with a historic soul, the Easterbrook Hall and Crichton Memorial Church is a hidden treasure situated on the 100 acres Crichton Estate in Dumfries, South West Scotland.

    The red sandstone buildings on the estate date back to 1834 with the Easterbrook Hall dating back to 1938. The building has been lovingly modernised whilst retaining its original charm and Art Deco features. The Crichton Memorial Church is more like a mini Cathedral and is considered to be one of the finest examples of ecclesiastical architecture in South Scotland. The ceiling is of carved oak and the floors a remarkable pattern of white, red, green and black marble imported from Italy and Ireland

    Established from the very beginning of the estate, acres of beautifully manicured lawns and impressive flower beds are maintained by our dedicated grounds keepers. The Rock Gardens have a wide variety of plants, miniature waterfall, ornamental pond and numerous seats and alcoves. Visitors are more than welcome to walk around our grounds, there are Heritage leaflets available from reception detailing walking routes around the estate. Why not have lunch at Neuro’s afterwards? www.neuros.co.uk

    Should you have an occasion to celebrate, our team has a wealth of experience in event management ranging from intimate family events to large scale celebrations, the talented and creative Kitchen brigade will tantalise your taste buds and our friendly events team will be on hand to make sure your event is everything you’ve dreamed of.

    Perhaps you are looking for live entertainment whilst visiting the region? Please see our sister site www.easterbrooklive.co.uk for details of upcoming events.

     
     
  • Loch Ryan Coastal Path Stranraer


    Locy Ryan Coastal Path Stranraer

    The Loch Ryan Coastal Path initially follows the shores of Loch Ryan from Stranraer to Cairnryan. The path then ascends into Glenapp and ends at Glenapp Church. (more…)

     
     
  • Torr Farm, Auchencairn


    Torr Farm, an organic dairy farm is located at the head of Auchencairn Bay. (more…)

     
     
  • NTS Rockcliffe Coastline


    Rockcliffe is one of Scotland’s most beautiful coastlines, stretching along the Solway Firth on the southern edge of Dumfries and Galloway.

    Part of a National Scenic Area, the National Trust for Scotland nature reserve is fringed with wildflowers and dotted with sailing villages. Further inland the shells and shingle give way to patches of ancient broadleaved woodland and meadows, rich with flowers, butterflies and birds.

    The important Dark Age trading post of Mote of Mark stands on a rocky outcrop. The 6th-century ramparts are still visible, and the summit has lovely views

     
     
  • Kirkmichael Community Shop and Cafe


    Kirkmichael Community Shop and Café

     

    A warm welcome awaits you in this beautiful conservation village, and our friendly staff are always happy to help. You’ll find many locally sourced products; such as honey, meats, free range eggs, jams, and seasonal fruit and vegetables.

    Our Café menu includes delicious traditional cakes, as well as light lunches and snacks. We also sell a range of takeaway snacks; including tea, coffee, homemade soup, filled rolls, and home baking.

     
     
  • Langholm Walks


    langholm_walking

     

    Langholm  on the banks of the River Esk is surrounded by rolling hills and offers many opportunities for walking. (more…)

     
     
  • Walking Festivals


    Lower Annandale Walking Festival
    Join our walkers for a weekend of walks in and around Annan. Enjoy great views, coupled with fascinating archaeology and history interpreted by our knowledgeable guides.
    T: 013873 80914
    click here for more information

    Newton Stewart Walking Festival
    Set in beautiful Galloway, the third annual walking festival includes strenuous walks on the highest hills in south-west Scotland, as a challenge to the dedicated hill-walker, and also gentle lowland explorations on which the walker can learn of the environment, past and present. On all walks we shall look at the wildlife and plants of the area.
    T: 01671 402770
    click here for more information

    Upper Nithsdale Walking Festival
    Join fellow walkers in a weekend of walks and entertainment. Upper Nithsdale has a wild and remote landscape – you really feel like you are in the middle of nowhere and yet, it is very accessible. The scenery is beautiful and the people friendly.
    T: 01659 50551
    click here for more information

    Langholm Walking Festival
    Enjoy a weekend in the hills and valleys around the picturesque town of Langholm, where you’ll receive a warm welcome.
    T: 013873 80914
    click here for more information

    Moffat Walking Festival
    Enjoy an autumnal break in the stunning Moffat Hills with a warm welcome from locals and fellow walkers. Now in its fifth year, the walking festival team know how to help you make the most of your weekend.

    T:01683 220227
    click here for more information

     
     
  • Galloway Forest Park


    Anytime is a great time to visit

    The Galloway Forest Park has everything you need for a great day out, whatever the time of year. Meet red deer and wild goats, choose from two scenic Forest Drives, follow in the footsteps of Robert the Bruce or picnic beside a peaceful loch. This is also Scotland’s first Dark Sky Park – one of the best places to stargaze in Europe!

    Start exploring from one of our three visitor centres. Kirroughtree is the gateway centre for the Galloway Forest Park and perfect for active adventures. Discover wonderful woods, water, hills and history at Glentrool and enjoy tranquil views over lochs and hills at Clatteringshaws.

    Kirroughtree and Glentrool are also home to two of the world-famous 7stanes mountain bike trail centres.

     

     
     
  • Mostly Ghostly Tours


    A warm welcome to the home of Mostly Ghostly ToursDumfries and Galloway’s first paranormal investigation team and creators of a range of well-researched ghost and local history tours encompassing everything from Scotland’s most haunted road to an intriguing vampire legend dating back to the 1

    2th century. We are proud winners of the 2012 & 2014 Dumfries & Galloway Life Tourism Champion Awards.

    Now in our eighth year as paranormal investigators, Mostly Ghostly, as our name suggests, are mainly focused on ghosts and hauntings, however we welcome reports of big cat sightings, UFOs, ostensible reincarnation and many other fascinating aspects of the paranormal and supernatural. United by our close friendships and determination to explore and evidence the unknown, we have all experienced something, both personally and collectively, that we cannot find a current explanation for.

    The team has since developed and diversified, creating five exciting tours showcasing elements unique to our region. While exploring innovative ways to fund our research visits, we had the idea of developing a ghost walk for Dumfries. With our existing passion for ghost stories and local studies combined with a desire to promote tourism and culture in the region, it seemed like a natural progression. Our philosophy is that a good story well told needs little in the way of artistic license; each event takes months of careful research to create a truly authentic experience.

     
     
  • Wanlockhead Lead Mining Museum


    The Visitor Centre is situated in the heart of the village of Wanlockhead, which is Scotland’s highest Village at 1531 ft./468.08 m. above sea level.

    (more…)

     
     
  • The Striding Arches


    Striding Arch byDavid Baird

    The Striding Arches are a number of iconic red sandstone arches in an area of Dumfries & Galloway known as Cairnhead.

    Nearest village is Moniaive from where the arches can be reached by driving about 7 miles along a narrow but highly scenic road.

    All the arches are around 4 metres in height and are made from red Dumfries-shire sandstone. The Striding Arches have been created by local artist Andy Goldsworthy and has also created arches in New Zealand, Canada and the USA.

    Many of the Striding Arches are on hill tops involving strenuous walks and some of the arches have no defined paths leading to them. full information can be obtained from the Striding Arches website.

    Photo Credit – main image of Leaping Arch by David Baird.

     

     
     
  • Mull of Galloway Experience


    Mull of Galloway

    Mull of Galloway Experience

    Visit ScotlandThe Mull of Galloway is Scotland’s most Southerly Point. At the end of a narrow peninsula with stunning views in every direction, the Mull of Galloway Lighthouse, the Lighthouse Exhibition, the RSPB Visitor Centre and Reserve and the stunning Gallie Craig Coffee House comprise the Mull of Galloway Experience, a Four Star Visit Scotland Visitor Attraction. The Mull of Galloway Trust purchased the land and buildings at the Mull of Galloway, with the exception of the tower, in a community buyout in 2013. The Mull of Galloway Trust is a Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation (SCIO) Charity Number: SC043557.

    The Mull of Galloway Lighthouse

    The Lighthouse at the Mull of Galloway is perched on the end of a 260 foot cliff. It was built by Robert Stevenson and first lit on 26th March 1830. The Lighthouse remains operational and is managed and monitored by Northern Lighthouse Board.

    The Lighthouse Tower is open to the public during the main season by kind permission of the Northern Lighthouse Board. A climb up the narrow, spiral staircase with its 115 steps to the viewing platform is rewarded by stunning views over Luce Bay to the Galloway Hills, the Fells of the Lake District, over the Irish Sea to the Isle of Man and Northern Ireland – four countries from one viewpoint! Friendly and knowledgeable staff from South Rhins Community Development Trust are at the top of the tower to answer any questions you may have and you will be awarded with a certificate of achievement for climbing the 115 steps. For members of the Association of Lighthouse Keepers’ the Mull of Galloway participates in the Lighthouse Passport Scheme.

    The Lighthouse and Exhibition open for the 2018 season on Good Friday. Please check the calendar on the website for the days of opening.

    Opening times are 11am until 5pm with last entry to the top of the Lighthouse Tower at 4.30pm.

    Lighthouse Exhibition at the Mull of Galloway

    The Exhibition is based in the former fuel store workshop and engine room next to the Stevenson Lighthouse. The original diesel engines that powered the fog horn can still be seen in the engine room.

    There are many interesting artefacts on view along with a wealth of fascinating information about the life and work of the Lighthouse Keepers’ in such a remote place and their families that lived there with them.

    Please check the website for the days of opening.

    Entry Charges for the Lighthouse & Exhibition for 2018

    Admission charges: Lighthouse Exhibition – £3.00 for adults and £1.00 for children under 14.
    Lighthouse Tower – £3.00 for adults and £1.00 for children under 14. Access to the Lighthouse Tower is by guided tour only.
    Combined visit to both the Lighthouse and Exhibition– £5.00 for adults and £1.50 for children under 14.

    Please note the tower tour is not suitable for anyone suffering from heart, breathing or balance difficulties and that any person under 1m in height will not be allowed access, this includes carried children. Visitors must wear sensible footwear to climb the tower.

    RSPB Nature Reserve at the Mull of Galloway

    The nature reserve at the Mull of Galloway is a 30 acre site and contains a huge variety of wildlife. There is a visitor centre where you can view the colonies of sea birds on the cliffs from cliff mounted cameras including guillemots, razorbills and kittiwakes. You may even see a puffin or two. On the nearby Scare or Scaur Rocks are enormous colonies of gannets

    On the clifftop heathland, there is much to be seen as well. Rare butterflies, birds such as the linnet and the stonechat and maybe some hares or a deer. Peregrines are also regular visitors.

    Guided walks are held every  Wednesday from 1pm to 3pm throughout the open season (April to the end of October).

    Opening Times –   The nature reserve and walks are open all year round. The RSPB Visitor Centre is open from Easter to the end of October.

    Gallie Craig Coffee House

    Gallie Craig is Scotland`s most southerly coffee house and gift shop and is named after the Gallie Craig Rock protruding from the sea south of the Mull of Galloway.

    The coffee house and gift shop have been designed in a most environmentally manner with a grass roof and predominantly glass walls enabling it to blend into the cliff side into which it is set.

    There is also a viewing platform right on the cliff edge from which you can enjoy a coffee whilst admiring the views and watch the seabirds and tides swirling below you.

    Visit the Mull of Galloway Experience at Scotland’s most Southerly Point in the far west of the region of Dumfries and Galloway. Dumfries and Galloway has been voted BBC Countryfile Magazine Holiday Destination of the Year for 2015/16.

     
     
  • Galloway Hills The Merrick


    merrick galloway hills

    The Merrick is probably the best known and most popular of the Galloway Hills. (more…)

     
     
  • Drumlanrig Castle and Country Estate


    If you like delving deep into history, soaking up the finest culture, exploring beautiful countryside – or adrenaline-fuelled mountain biking – you’ll love a day at Drumlanrig Castle. From activities for kids to salmon fishing, you’ll find a raft of activity awaiting you. The Castle has 120 rooms, 17 turrets and four towers and from your very first glance you’ll know you’re entering a special place. Special enough, in fact, that the producers of Outlander recently used the Castle for filming their second series!

    You will discover Rembrandt’s Old Lady Reading and family portraits by artists such as Thomas Gainsborough, landscapes by Paul Sandby and the Dutch masters, and cartoons by Rowlandson amid the finest furnishing and antiques.

    The 90,000 acre Estate boasts miles of beautiful walks and acres of gardens. Launch yourself down one of our championship mountain biking trails, or hook yourself a salmon, fishing on the river. Activities for kids include everything from the adventure playground to ranger-led wildlife walks and a host of events.

    The Castle is the stunning Dumfriesshire seat of the Duke and Duchess of Buccleuch and Queensberry, and they hope you find it as inspiring as they do.

     
     
Visit us on Facebook Visit us on Twitter